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Eliot Eames Saarinen Exhibition No. 03/03

On May 24, 2018 Lucky Post is proud to present Eliot Eames Saarinen’s No. 03/03, the third show in a series that began at the company’s inception. In this new exhibit, defining one’s self, either in relation to outside influences or accumulated objects, is presented in two original artistic collections.

Lucky Post’s first exhibition No. 01/01 showcased at the company’s Grand Opening on May 24, 2012, and featured pieces that journeyed through Eliot’s recovery from addiction. The collection provided a revealing exploration that exposed the artist’s perceptive talent and set the stage for what was to become an ongoing relationship between Eliot and Lucky Post, a place founded to cultivate talent and support creativity.

Eliot began his first year at the prestigious Art Center in Los Angeles, California in the Fall of 2012. During this time, Eliot applied his autodidactic approach to art and natural gift for creative process to a formal exploration. He shared a new collection, No. 02/02, at Lucky Post on February 24th, 2015. This series examined the rapid obsolescence of technology though one of the oldest forms of communication: hand made painting, drawing and assemblage. Changing pathways, human interaction, and our temporal obsession to document, were undercurrents in this series which upended representation and payed quiet homage to his design lineage - the grandson of visionary designer and Eames’ colleague Eero Saarinen. Devouring theory and practice he was honored as the Art Center’s 2017 Valedictorian.

In the current exhibition, No. 03/03, identity is still at the center of his work - abstracted, often playful, systematic, and a layering of color and contrast. Written stories of misperceptions and misadventures are companion pieces of the adventures behind the canvas - life’s moments of humorous self-reflection, and honest confessionals on masculinity.

“Some like to say painting is dead,” he explains. “I took that idea in several large scale paintings and played with incorporating cyanotype, an early photographic process that involves blue-print. If the medium is the message, it’s been flattened out and manipulated. In considering the context of Lucky Post, some of the work weaves in the sociological input and influence of pop culture in shaping our perception. It’s both critical and playful, in what I hope is a conversation to bridge both worlds.”

Another set in the new show is comprised of collages made from detritus accumulated in pockets, layered, arranged, and abstracted. The collages, shown together as a group, produce an investigation into what defines us. In this case: data sets and systems of forgotten material.

In speaking about his artistic journey, Eliot notes, “I’ve learned from previous shows - and am still interested in the power of mediation and the way in which organic and inorganic composite. The themes that got me here -- genealogy, context, relationships -- are all still on the table but less overt. I want the pieces to invite conversation, to have people fill the space in between the work and themselves.”

Eliot Eames Saarinen Exhibition No. 03/03


On May 24, 2018 Lucky Post is proud to present Eliot Eames Saarinen’s No. 03/03, the third show in a series that began at the company’s inception. In this new exhibit, defining one’s self, either in relation to outside influences or accumulated objects, is presented in two original artistic collections.

Lucky Post’s first exhibition No. 01/01 showcased at the company’s Grand Opening on May 24, 2012, and featured pieces that journeyed through Eliot’s recovery from addiction. The collection provided a revealing exploration that exposed the artist’s perceptive talent and set the stage for what was to become an ongoing relationship between Eliot and Lucky Post, a place founded to cultivate talent and support creativity.

Eliot began his first year at the prestigious Art Center in Los Angeles, California in the Fall of 2012. During this time, Eliot applied his autodidactic approach to art and natural gift for creative process to a formal exploration. He shared a new collection, No. 02/02, at Lucky Post on February 24th, 2015. This series examined the rapid obsolescence of technology though one of the oldest forms of communication: hand made painting, drawing and assemblage. Changing pathways, human interaction, and our temporal obsession to document, were undercurrents in this series which upended representation and payed quiet homage to his design lineage - the grandson of visionary designer and Eames’ colleague Eero Saarinen. Devouring theory and practice he was honored as the Art Center’s 2017 Valedictorian.

In the current exhibition, No. 03/03, identity is still at the center of his work - abstracted, often playful, systematic, and a layering of color and contrast. Written stories of misperceptions and misadventures are companion pieces of the adventures behind the canvas - life’s moments of humorous self-reflection, and honest confessionals on masculinity.

“Some like to say painting is dead,” he explains. “I took that idea in several large scale paintings and played with incorporating cyanotype, an early photographic process that involves blue-print. If the medium is the message, it’s been flattened out and manipulated. In considering the context of Lucky Post, some of the work weaves in the sociological input and influence of pop culture in shaping our perception. It’s both critical and playful, in what I hope is a conversation to bridge both worlds.”

Another set in the new show is comprised of collages made from detritus accumulated in pockets, layered, arranged, and abstracted. The collages, shown together as a group, produce an investigation into what defines us. In this case: data sets and systems of forgotten material.

In speaking about his artistic journey, Eliot notes, “I’ve learned from previous shows - and am still interested in the power of mediation and the way in which organic and inorganic composite. The themes that got me here -- genealogy, context, relationships -- are all still on the table but less overt. I want the pieces to invite conversation, to have people fill the space in between the work and themselves.”